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You're Always Welcome Here
Throughout Salford there are symbols of movement and freedom, opportunity and potential yet the city is plagued by it's leading levels of poverty, unemployment and in-education. The only places with true accessibility are the sites of gambling, homelessness and control.
...but words will never hurt me.
Nights Out Aren't What They Used To Be
A series of images shot on the first Saturday night of the 2020 lockdown. Each scene is from the Northern Quarter and surrounding areas in Manchester at approximately 9pm.
A Search for Juba, Lost In Royton
By no means the first, but possibly the most documented, enslaved man in the Lancashire and Greater Manchester area Juba Royton is notable for his few but unique appearances in local and national records. These dates are merely records of occasions in his life, no images of him, no history before his arrival in Oldham and no indication to the type of man he was beyond what the records infer.
(Vicarious) Self Portrait
An exploration of the meaning of self and the ‘Portrait’ Through this set of images I hope to capture the concept of the portrait being more a reflection of the artist than an insight to the subject. The portrait is a result of many decisions made by the photographer, those decisions tainted by their observations, pre-conceptions and agenda. At some point the product of those decisions is more the interpretation of the photographer than the representation of the subject. The ability to manipulate and alter the image leaves us open to believing someone looks or even acts a certain way. Photographers can create masks, beauty or deceit. In many ways photographers are, through their subject, taking a self portrait albeit vicariously.
Home is Where The Heart is
'Home is Where The Heart is' was a project I completed with the support of Coffee4Craig, a Manchester based homeless charity. This project was intended as a question of the representation of those who are in a position to call themselves homeless after personal circumstances have lead to them requiring help to find shelter, food, clothing and other sources of medical or personal support. As apposed to the architypal image of individuals in these circumstances the project was to connect the subjects with an audience in a way which created a sense of uniqueness, individuality and equality. Each story and person has their own specific needs and their own story to tell in how they became homeless and ultimately progressed on to anew chapter in their life.
What Jasmine Smelt
Jasmine is my rescue dog and best friend for many years. I often walk with her to and from places I need to go and most often to a place where I can play games with her in a semi controlled way. This series was a personal decision to let Jazz take control of several walks and lead the way. Mainly as I found I tended to also be rushing and hurrying around our pre-set route and destinations. I found myself thinking of what she sees and smells and how she interprets the world. I also thought of how I myself was the cause of our hasty walks and with this series I took the time to enjoy the experience of being with her.
Winter's Harvest
This is Not a Photograph of a Policeman
‘This is Not a Photograph of a Policeman’ Saturday 19th September 2020, four days prior to the introduction of stricter restrictions of the gathering of people and opening hours of hospital venues during the resurgence of Covid-19 infections. How do people react when presented with information outside of their everyday routine? Do they stop and examine, turn away and ignore, carry on unaware or destroy it? At 10am Manchester interacted with a cardboard policeman carrying a bundle of deflated latex gloves and a message of ‘Keep Calm and Carry On’. At 11.15am it was removed by Arndale Security assisted by a homeless man. I don’t know whether I should be annoyed by its short life or worried it lasted so long.
Remember That Time When...